| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • You already know Dokkio is an AI-powered assistant to organize & manage your digital files & messages. Very soon, Dokkio will support Outlook as well as One Drive. Check it out today!

View
 

Bonner Video Project Guide to Making Quality Movies

Page history last edited by Rebecca Grinstead 14 years, 4 months ago

Hello Bonner Network!  

 

This webpage is a quick guide to making high quality Bonner videos.  Please take a look at all of the resources and begin making your Bonner films!

 


 

What Makes a High Quality Video?

1. Good videos have a point, a reason for being created.  Ask yourself this question: Why am I making this video?  What is the goal of this video, what will it accomplish?  Some great examples of great Bonner videos with a goal are: 

  • A recruitment video: the purpose/goal of this video is to recruit more on-going volunteers for our after-school youth program 
  • An issue-awareness video: the purpose/goal of this video is to raise awareness about the homeless population in Mercer County and let people know how to get involved to end homelessness in Mercer County
  • A training video: the purpose/goal of this video is to train new Bonners on how to log their service hours.

 

2. Good videos have a clearly defined audience.  Ask yourself this question: who am I making this video for?  This is a strategic question and will help you identify how long the movie should be, how you tell the story you want to tell in your video, and where you post/show this video.  The audiences for the above there videos would be: 

  • A recruitment video: the purpose/goal of this video is to recruit more on-going volunteers for our after-school youth program Audience: college students on my campus who have never heard of Bonner
  • An issue-awareness video: the purpose/goal of this video is to raise awareness about the homeless population in Mercer County and let people know how to get involved to end homelessness in Mercer County Audience: college students in Mercer County
  • A training video: the purpose/goal of this video is to train new Bonners on how to log their service hours. Audience: first-year Bonner students

 

3. Once you've defined the purpose/goal of your video and determined the target audience for your video, you should decide your persuasion strategy.  Ask yourself: what creative elements am I going to use to make this video compelling to my audience so that it will fulfill its purpose?

A Quality Video:

 

 

MovieActionPlan2010.pdf

 

How to Tell a Story in Video

 

Check out NPR's Scott Simon's quick tips video on How to Tell a Compelling Story in video:

YouTube plugin error

For more info: DigiNovations Blog entry on Video Storytelling 

 

Overview

Learn the basics of how to create a compelling video, from the initial planning stage to production, editing, and sharing it with friends and family.

Tell a Story with Video

Everyone has been forced to sit through a boring movie at one time or another. Anyone can push a few buttons on a video camera and capture a segment of time but a truly interesting movie is more than just a series of images or a montage of videos. It shares an experience and captures the spirit. When created with care, a little bit of creativity, and forethought, a good movie tells a story that makes viewers sit up and take notice.

Step 1: Plan Your Story

How do you go about creating a truly compelling story? Before you shoot a single frame, you should understand exactly how you want your story to be told and what you want the audience to take away from it. No matter what kind of story you choose to tell, the best place to start isn't with a camera and microphone -- it's with a pen and paper. If you already have a story idea in mind, sit down and start brainstorming a few key questions, such as:

  • What makes this story worth telling?
  • Who is your audience? Is this video for a business audience, or is it for family or friends?
  • What are the key events that propelled the story in the first place? What is happening with the story now?
  • What are the consequences or results of a particular outcome? Of another outcome?
  • What point of view will you take? Will you tell the story from your own perspective, from that of one of your subjects, or will a third-person narrator do the talking?

Thinking about the answers to these questions before you begin to shoot helps you identify how your video will connect emotionally with the audience, from what sort of tone you're going to adopt to how long the video is going to be.

With an idea in your head of how your story will unfold, create a storyboard that lays out the flow of action. This can be as simple or as elaborate as you want -- the idea is to help provide a little structure once you begin shooting.

 

 

 

 

Keys to Video Storytelling 

 

Tips for Lighting 

Tips for Framing a Video Interview

Conducting a Video Interview

Shooting B-Roll

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.